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too little too much

I've been cutting reworking resequencing to make an interesting first book manuscript.

I had 70 pages now it's down to 59 pages. (all in all I've cut about 78 poems over the years).

The poems I cut needed to be cut (too many flippant "NY school" poems for one manuscript), but I am wondering if 59 pages is not enough. Quite a few of the poems are 4-5 pages long. Can 59 pages turn into 69 pages when a book is bound by a publisher?

Hm . . .

I tried rescuing a few poems and made them much worse. I just had to let 'em go.

I wasn't attached to the poems but I was attached to a few of the phrasings. (Reuse poems for parts).

Starting Lee Ann Brown's _The Sleep that Changed Everything_. Her reading/performance at the Carrboro poetry festival was so amazing. I am excited to read her work on the page (with my reading voice mixed with her performance voice running in the background).

I don't think there is any such thing as silent reading. There's always a voice when reading. Even if it is not vocal.

Finished _Jones_ last night. I was amazed. The language of description, poetic diction (strewn), the poetics of place, recurring images. The book really felt effortless and haunting. Strands of narrative (the street gang, the uncurling cigarette, soggy newspaper). The images/descriptions are evocative and swirl around to create strands of a narrative. Disproves the notion of movements locking its practitioners into a lock step. The more I read of "Langpo" the more my expectations of Langpo changes. There are very real aesthetic differences between Ron Silliman and Michael Palmer. Such much variation in between and among the langpo scenes.

A little while ago I was also amazed when I sat down and read individual "beat" poets. Again, so much variation. I've found it much more worthwhile to read seperate collections from individual poets (versus selected or anthologies). Anthologies seem fine for a quick brouse (like most lit mags). I enjoyed reading through _An Anthology of new (American) poets. Brief introductions of poets can help me decide which poets/books I want to read in the near future

The new (American) poets anthology got me excited to find and read books by Peter Gizzi, Mark Nowak, Pam Rehm, Chris Stroffolino, and Mary Burger.

I am amazed excited thrilled. So much variation. Such a wide world out there. For so long I was looking through a well wiped window with a view of a well trimmed garden which was on the hillside behind a palace wall (i.e.the university).

Who does the legit says more about the legit that what is legit.

Language is large enough for a life of its own (have you ever been experienced?)

I am maximalist mind with minimalist heart.


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Another Ireland: Part Two
Maurice Scully, The Basic Colours. Durham, UK: Pig Press, 1994.
Geoffrey Squires, Landscapes and Silences. Dublin: New Writers' Press, 1996.
Catherine Walsh, Idir Eatortha and Making Tents. London: Invisible Books, 1996.

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