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A Wild Lucifer Poetics Tour of the East Coast

What an amazing trip with the Lucifer Poetics Group. I am exhausted but very happy. Brian Howe has a nice report at:

Slatherpus

Mike Snider has a brief account of the Baltimore reading here:

Mike Snider's Report

Greg Deslie has some pics from the Ithaca reading:

Poetry Space

and some pics from Reb Livingston (from the Baltimore reading)

Baltimore Pics

It is also rumored Matthew Shindell may have a recording of the reading in Baltimore for his poetry radio show My Vocabulary. LOOK OUT!

I'll post some pics soon. Once my mac mini arrives in the mail.

Comments

Anonymous said…
good post... thanks.

Kim
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