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what is it about the penis


I am wondering what the ratio might be between ancient art celebrating the life giving powers of the penis versus ancient art celebrating the life giving powers of the vagina?

Sometimes I feel guilt for having a penis. I mean all the horrible history (the many relationships between violence and the penis both literally and symbolically).

But other times it feels good to celebrate the penis (as well as the vagina).

What a long complex history of shame and guilt about female and male genitals. Why? Power and pleasure. Religion.

It's an ongoing struggle. Pleasure can be chaotic, animal-like and must be controlled via shame and guilt. The shame and guilt can often manifest in monstrous ways.

When a woman makes a joke about a big dick it is exciting and powerful. Much different than when a man makes the same joke of course. But I wonder what it would take for men to try on bragging about the vagina? What kind of language? Lick my hood?

I am wondering how the language of the female body can signify energy and motion and power without using the language of the dick banter? Is it possible?

Comments

Amy said…
Karen Horney, one of Freud's students, turned the table when she posited that men actually fear being swallowed up by the vagina. Maybe we can use that to turn the tables? Although I don't think being swallowed up is as threatening as being poked or stuck with something, even a penis.

Or maybe we just make more violence by trying to turn the tables like Foxx Brown, "I cut like I trained Lorena Bobbit" ... I don't know. I think it's all in the equation, and the equation needs to be thrown off balance and dismantled. The question is "How?"

You're great, Marcus. I dub thee Marcus the Brave, if that's okay ~

xxo
Oh, stop over-analyzing it to death already. Penis good. There, done, finis.

All the shit that you are positing thru is some left over shit from long dead people. Growing up around young inner city youth, I used to be so offended when a dude would just hold his "jock" (because I was SUPPOSED to be) until I realized it wasn't a big deal to them. I used to huff and puff about the word bitch being substituted for "woman with a sassy attitude" or "sexually available female" until I realized that sometimes when I'd done not just good but great, I was "that bitch". And we are not even going to get into the word "nigga"...
Point being, relax. Give your penis an affectionate squeeze for having ever felt guilty for having one.
Guilty for what? Men are great.

And how do you brag about the vagina? Are you serious? How about "good ass pussy?" as in "that was some good ass pussy" or "my Milkshake" as in "My milkshake tastes better than yours" or jelly as in "I don't think you're ready for this jelly." The key, I think, to making vagina sound like it is exciting and powerful is in repeating the compliments you've gotten on it and recounting tales of the bodies you've left in its wake.
There are sooo many ways to say your vagina is good, its unreal but it might not be something women will ever do because its kind of an invitation, like when a man starts talking about how big his dick is.
And if your question was how do you brag to other men about how good some vagina you are being made privy to is- why would you want to do that?

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