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Notes from Korea (part three)

I've tentatively decided to name this new project/ms WONDERLAND. It fits perfectly. Here are a few more rough entries. All of these are unrevised. I will revise more later.

1/22/06

My anti-hero has painful hiccups

At the end of this journey
I will become a blip
in other words in or
above the clouds.

I keep hearing Mona’s meow but she is halfway across the world.

The coffee was warm but my foot is asleep.

Does it take longer to spot or spy?
Both require my small eye.


1/24/06

It’s really
moment by
moment

what a glorious
failure

paying at-
tention is hard

2/4/06

Six days till payday and I have ten dollars left

I am keeping it cool

2/6/06

Four days till payday

I am still cool

2/7/06

Incomplete language does not truncate desire
My mother tongue is on the roof
of my mouth

This is not London

This is not Seattle

This is not Portadown

My Irish tongue wants back

I have too many tongues

This is not Ireland
This is not America
This is not England

I have an Irish cousin teaching in Seoul.

His tongue is almost my tongue.

2/9/06

This is not a school. Money rules the roost. Grades? It don’t mean a thing. GATE is being branded. The students are branded. Wonderland is branded. I speak for the brand. I will speak to mothers for the fourth time while another brand translates. The big brand wants more money. It’s for the children. There is no other place to put it. A complete tour takes 10,000 years. Swallow until the organ is gone. Even stagnant air sings.

Comments

Chris Vitiello said…
Marcus, this wonderland work, particularly that 2/7 entry, is outstanding. It's quieter and more intense than your other work. Well, differently intense is a better way of putting it.
Now, a concrete question. Is there English or English transliteration on local signage, like on street signs and so forth? In Tokyo I noticed that the Japanese was transliterated on all the subway stops, but on none of the street signs. I'm curious about how this is handled there.
We miss you in NC,
cv
postpran said…
Thanks Chris. It's nice to have some encouragement.

The street signs do not exist, no it is difficult to find my way around. I mostly take the subway and taxis.

Some of the buildings are in English. There is lots of strange English. Once I learn the alphabet I will read the signs. A few folks have the read the signs for me in Korean characters. When you sound out the letters it is a mix between Korean and English. Korglish?

Some of my students essays are fasinating. For now that is the only poetry I am reading. They really try to use interesting metaphors and it ends up creating a strange juxtaposition.

I miss you guys too. I am really jealous of the Blue Door and Desert City. I hope it's still going strong in a year.
Erin B. said…
Marcus, keep it up. This is outstanding and I want to keep reading but the rest of it is still up in your head. I'll wait.
Jim Kober said…
This is great Marcus.

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