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fixed and sore

returned home from the clinic on Saturday. Feeling very sore. hot little knives near my groin. But I hope by the end of the week the pain will go away. I also hope the hernia is gone for good. It is all a bit of a haze. Morphine. Numbing the lower part of my body. Arms stretched out and watching them open and tug near the groin area from the mirror on the ceiling. The main surgeon spoke a little English but none of the nurses. When I was in a bit of pain throughout the night we communicated via hand signals. I felt like a bit of an alien. I kind of like morphine. It's a nice feeling.

But all in all it was small surgery and I should recover quite quickly. I am not looking forward to teaching tomorrow. Long long teaching days. sometimes they stretch out from 6AM-9PM with small breaks in between.

I am hoping to find some space soon. Don't like living with a dirty flatmate. But hopefully in July i will be in a new clean place. I really would love a desk or something so I can write on my laptop. It is really nice to have Internet at the school though. A great thing on the weekends.

If i can just get a permanent address for one year. Order some books. Teach. Do some writing. Send shit to publishers. I can't really get into a groove for very long.

But I am almost finished with my ms from Korea now called Hermit Kingdom. And almost finished with ms from Poland called Godzeenie (god of time). But I haven't submitted much due to sporadic Internet access and constant moving around.

I try to keep to my room in the new flat. I guess the sticky grease stained floors and dirty dishes and bits of old food on the counters really get to me sometimes. I just use a dish, wash it, and put it away. So simple. But it's getting hard to ignore. My flatmate is a nice guy though. Just the dirtiest and messiest fella I have ever met. I cleaned up after him for one week, but it is a never ending battle. swimming upstream. Now I am just trying to count the weeks. 6 more weeks. Yeah six more weeks. Then a new flat, a new flatmate, a month of summer teaching (Polish army, children's camp, companies).

It could always always always be a hella lot worse.

ok. Now I got to stand up. Little daggers jabbin my groin again . . .

Comments

Anonymous said…
Hi again,
Good to hear that you survived Polish hospital. I left you a small message at PoF. Taking off to London tomorrow for business trip, than I'll be back for 2 days and off again to Albania for vacation, but would love to talk to You!
All best from Warsaw!
B.
JWG said…
Good for the grand belly. It is the center of power. Keep it well. Reading with interest. I am tired of korea. How about south america?

my verification: NY por
postpran said…
Jim,

Yeah South America could be cool. I am sticky at the moment. I am hoping to get unsticky soon. I can't get wait to get the bandage off so I can have a proper shower.

B,

Have a great time in London. Talk soon :-)

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