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small press book fair in London

SMALL PUBLISHERS FAIR 2008

Conway Hall,
Red Lion Square,
London WC1R 4RL

FRIDAY 24th and SATURDAY 25th OCTOBER

Open 11am to 7pm, admission to bookfair and readings is free. Holborn tube.



Readings and Events on Saturday 25th.

1.00. 'Playing with Words': booklaunch & performances by David Toop,
Ansuman Biswas, Brown Sierra & Nye Parry

1.30.
Royal Holloway Poetic Practice:
Anna McKerrow & Becky Cremin

2.00
Cluster Arts Magazine Act Two:
selected performances and readings

2.30.
Kyle Schlesinger (Cuniform Press)
Charles Alexander, Chax

3.00.
Booklaunch: The Reality Street Book of Sonnets,
introduced by Jeff Hilson with a star-studded cast of sonneteers.

4.00.
Vincent Katz reads 'Barge',
a collaboration with Jim Dine

4.30.
West House Books
David Annwn and Martin Corless-Smith

5.00.
Les Coleman
The cat Talked in Latin with Greek

5.30.
Veer Books launch Bill Griffiths' The Lion Man + readings by Sean Bonney, Johan de Wit, Piers Hugill, Jow Lindsay, Aodan McCardle & Stephen Mooney

This years fair has over 60 publishers participating. For full details visit:

small press book fair

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