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from primitive pianos

18th Dec 2010
(return to London)

given what we have seen
Ryanair equals sardines
my bag is in number 29
and I am in number 3
they are playing Mozart
the elf a stewardess
wrapped in tinsel
selling everything
“your captain invites you
to read the card in front of you”
i’m over my usual weight
i didn’t do much with Italy
why couldn’t i have been Joyce
in Trieste
I keep forgetting it is almost Christmas
you’ll drive yourself nuts trying
to get what you want
JINGLES
they fuck you up

Comments

link wheel said…
Hey cool weblog, just wondering what anti-spam software you use for comments because i get lots on my blog. Anyway, in my language, there should not much good supply like this.
linkwheel said…
Completely understand what your stance on this matter. Though I might disagree on a number of the finer details, I think you probably did an awesome job explaining it. Sure beats having to analysis it on my own. Thanks. Anyway, in my language, there aren't a lot good supply like this.

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