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last entry for trieste (not counting coming revisions)


16th December 2010


a little love
feast
banging

on invisible
headboards

the tired grunts
of a golden
retriever

this goes
very slowly

there are so many
molecules

I shd be satisfied
at some point

i am kicked
in some stupid places

let me think
without

bliss

is a simple thing

i take up
loving

the golden ones smells
a bit better

from a name brand
galaxy

into the wild blue yonder

muffled voices on the
cranked winds

teethed to dying
meat

i am en-
joined

to morph
back into human form

we believed we
were

somehow back
on earth

pre-
historic
again

and this is what it
looks like

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