Skip to main content

london return

1.5 hours till i leave for the airport. here we go. london . . . .

Comments

jwg said…
Has the plane landed yet?
postpran said…
ahhh yes :-) drinking fish tea . . . sorting my nose twitches . . . eating a kebab roll later :-) got a nice red used jacket which feels slippery waterproof type . . . from Oxfam . . snot rags in pockets so gonna give it a wee wash . . .

christmas dinner at a London pub methinks . . .

hope all is well in Seoul :)
link wheel said…
I used to be questioning if you want to be a visitor poster on my web site? and in exchange you might embrace a hyperlink your publish? Please reply once you get a chance and I'll send you my contact particulars - thanks. Anyway, in my language, there aren't much good supply like this.
linkwheel said…
Have you ever ever thought-about including more videos to your blog posts to keep the readers more entertained? I imply I simply learn by way of your complete article of yours and it was quite good but since I'm more of a visible learner,I discovered that to be more helpful effectively let me know the way it seems! I love what you guys are all the time up too. Such clever work and reporting! Keep up the nice works guys I've added you guys to my blogroll. This is a nice article thanks for sharing this informative information.. I will visit your blog usually for some latest post. Anyway, in my language, there will not be a lot good supply like this.

Popular posts from this blog

poets reading poets

There are on A now: Andrews, Antin, Apollinaire, Ashbery


A project from the Atlanta Poetry Group. Check it:

http://atlantapoetsgroup.blogspot.co.uk/

The Poetry of Tao Lin

Another Ireland by Robert Archambeau

This review really hit it for me. I recently read Maurice Scully's _Livelihood_ and Geofrey Squires _Untitled and Other Poems_ is on deck (I love that baseball term. It is baseball, right?)

I think this is from The Nortre Dame review, but I found it via goofle (I mean google).


Another Ireland: Part Two
Maurice Scully, The Basic Colours. Durham, UK: Pig Press, 1994.
Geoffrey Squires, Landscapes and Silences. Dublin: New Writers' Press, 1996.
Catherine Walsh, Idir Eatortha and Making Tents. London: Invisible Books, 1996.

By Robert Archambeau

I began the first half of this article (Notre Dame Review #4) by mentioning some of the limits to the legendary hospitality Ireland has shown to its poets. If you arrive in Ireland from any point of departure outside of Eastern Europe, you will indeed find a public far more willing than the one you left behind to grant poets the recognition all but the most ascetic secretly crave. However, this hospitality has never extended to Irish poets w…