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DEPARTMENT 3

The UK revolution in language continues . . . . Department 3 now available. . .

edited by the super duper editorial vision of


Richard Barrett & Simon Howard


writing from Marie-Angelique Bueler, Wayne Clements, Matt Dalby, David Grundy, Catherine Hales, Ryan Ormonde, Posie Rider, Marcus Slease, & Tom Watts.

check it:


Department Magazine

Comments

link wheel said…
Wonderful learn, I simply passed this onto a colleague who was doing some research on that. And he really bought me lunch because I found it for him smile So let me rephrase that: Thanks for lunch! Anyway, in my language, there are not much good supply like this.
linkwheel said…
Your weblog is fine. I just wish to comment on the design. Its too loud. Its doing way an excessive amount of and it takes away from what youve received to say --which I feel is basically important. I dont know if you happen to didnt suppose that your phrases could maintain everyones attention, however you had been wrong. Anyway, in my language, there aren't a lot good source like this.

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This review really hit it for me. I recently read Maurice Scully's _Livelihood_ and Geofrey Squires _Untitled and Other Poems_ is on deck (I love that baseball term. It is baseball, right?)

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Another Ireland: Part Two
Maurice Scully, The Basic Colours. Durham, UK: Pig Press, 1994.
Geoffrey Squires, Landscapes and Silences. Dublin: New Writers' Press, 1996.
Catherine Walsh, Idir Eatortha and Making Tents. London: Invisible Books, 1996.

By Robert Archambeau

I began the first half of this article (Notre Dame Review #4) by mentioning some of the limits to the legendary hospitality Ireland has shown to its poets. If you arrive in Ireland from any point of departure outside of Eastern Europe, you will indeed find a public far more willing than the one you left behind to grant poets the recognition all but the most ascetic secretly crave. However, this hospitality has never extended to Irish poets w…