Skip to main content

from Smashing Time (ms in progress)

S.B.’s Ghost Shit

soap me sock me I got a table at the rainbow room
big ship
approaching the dock
I’ve got you heavy in this London sunshine
Wood Green March 4th 2011
and an Indian at the table is really a hyena
that’s who I am
suppose has some facts around
yep! imaginary income! UGH!
well the crooks are out
spastic garage feedback blues
S.B.’s GHOST SHIT!
and look at these steeples
shaking
in the first degree
the devil won’t let me be


. . . to be cont . . . . . .

Comments

link wheel said…
Please inform me it labored proper? I dont wish to sumit it again if i would not have to! Either the blog glitced out or i'm an idiot, the second option doesnt shock me lol. thanks for an ideal blog! Anyway, in my language, there are not much good source like this.
linkwheel said…
I was questioning what is up with that bizarre gravatar??? I know 5am is early and I'm not wanting my finest at that hour, however I hope I do not seem like this! I'd nonetheless make that face if I am requested to do a hundred pushups. lol Anyway, in my language, there should not much good source like this.
sim so dep said…
I did not want to came her but when i saw this megazine with this post and it's freind list as well than i could not stop to post comment, thanks to author for this incredible article.

Popular posts from this blog

poets reading poets

There are on A now: Andrews, Antin, Apollinaire, Ashbery


A project from the Atlanta Poetry Group. Check it:

http://atlantapoetsgroup.blogspot.co.uk/

The Poetry of Tao Lin

Another Ireland by Robert Archambeau

This review really hit it for me. I recently read Maurice Scully's _Livelihood_ and Geofrey Squires _Untitled and Other Poems_ is on deck (I love that baseball term. It is baseball, right?)

I think this is from The Nortre Dame review, but I found it via goofle (I mean google).


Another Ireland: Part Two
Maurice Scully, The Basic Colours. Durham, UK: Pig Press, 1994.
Geoffrey Squires, Landscapes and Silences. Dublin: New Writers' Press, 1996.
Catherine Walsh, Idir Eatortha and Making Tents. London: Invisible Books, 1996.

By Robert Archambeau

I began the first half of this article (Notre Dame Review #4) by mentioning some of the limits to the legendary hospitality Ireland has shown to its poets. If you arrive in Ireland from any point of departure outside of Eastern Europe, you will indeed find a public far more willing than the one you left behind to grant poets the recognition all but the most ascetic secretly crave. However, this hospitality has never extended to Irish poets w…