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SPRUNG FORMAL 8



DO YOU LIKE BEAVERS? DO YOU LIKE POLAND? I HAVE A FLASH FICTION IN LIL' SPRUNG FORMAL/ISSUE 8. IT IS SHORT. IT IS ABOUT BEAVERS, POLAND, WALNUT FIRE, GANGNAM STYLE, AND OTHER POLISH TRADITIONS . .

FAB ISSUE. HAPPY TO BE IN THERE . .




Featuring work by: Ben Fama, Abby Carr, Sarah Jean Alexander, Dillon J. Welch, Chuck Young, Teal Wilson, Abeleine Throckmorton, Brittany Ficken, Anna Kamerer, Rachel Benson, Malory Ward, Piotr Gwiazda, Nick Sturm, Stephen O'Toole, Jaclyn Senne, Marcus Slease, Nika Winn, Tyler Cain Lacy, Nicki Blanchard, Jessica Cornelison, Jessi Wilson, Adam Clay, J. Victoria Terrell, Matt Hart, Stacy Kidd, Laedan Galicia, Brian Clifton, Paul Siegell, Miles Fermin, Alli Warren, Melissa Eleftherion, Nathan Masserang, Andy Ozier, Anna Martin, Lauren Stookey






http://issuu.com/sprungformal/docs/lilsprung2013 

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This review really hit it for me. I recently read Maurice Scully's _Livelihood_ and Geofrey Squires _Untitled and Other Poems_ is on deck (I love that baseball term. It is baseball, right?)

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Another Ireland: Part Two
Maurice Scully, The Basic Colours. Durham, UK: Pig Press, 1994.
Geoffrey Squires, Landscapes and Silences. Dublin: New Writers' Press, 1996.
Catherine Walsh, Idir Eatortha and Making Tents. London: Invisible Books, 1996.

By Robert Archambeau

I began the first half of this article (Notre Dame Review #4) by mentioning some of the limits to the legendary hospitality Ireland has shown to its poets. If you arrive in Ireland from any point of departure outside of Eastern Europe, you will indeed find a public far more willing than the one you left behind to grant poets the recognition all but the most ascetic secretly crave. However, this hospitality has never extended to Irish poets w…