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SAINTS ON FILM




 (left to right: Saint Erkembode, Marcus Slease, Ewa)



11th November 2013


NOT JUST ANOTHER SAINT PERFORMANCE NIGHT AT HARDY TREE GALLERY IN LONDON.

IT WAS CALLED

SAINTS ON FILM

I changed into a white robe and Saint Erkembode screened the film he made on my back while I read a collaborative story about traveling through London to find a Doom Drone concert. The film had a drone loop and featured some of the words from the story. The words from the story sometimes appeared on my back. On the white robe. I read the story to the audience with my back to them. I was on a step ladder so the film could be projected onto my back and my head.

In the story I read we went through the USSR to get to the Doom Drone concert. We got lost. A lot. We rode kangaroos and looked for chunky ice cream and ate hot milk over chips etc. etc. 

it is based on a true story. The story is called YOU'VE BEEN PUSHING SINCE LAHORE (written by Chris Gutkind, me(marcus slease), and Saint Erkembode.
S
ome fun and interesting films on the night too. A Burroughs cut up film from 1966 and marshes and meshes and a crow surreal film and a man who played live organ electronic music to accompany his film live in the gallery. 

Outsider art. No academic bullshit!
http://leapintothevoid.co.uk/erkembode-not-just-another-saint-november-7th-december-1st-2013/

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